Tagged: Twitter

The Would-be Success of The Company That I Work For

Mr. President of The Company I Work For, 

My name is Donna and I’ve just started working here at The Company That I Work For. I’m really enjoying the environment and the work that we do. However it has come to my attention that we do not have a presence on social media. I know we have our website but I feel like we are really missing out on a  great opportunity. Social media has many advantages that will help get our name out there.

There are 3 kinds of social media that I’d would like you to consider; Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

As you must know Facebook is a very popular platform for networking. If we created a Facebook group for our company we could share it across a much bigger audience than we could by our methods now. We can gain likes and followers so that we can keep our customers updated on the latest coming out of our company’s doors. This is also a great way to receive feedback on our customers through comments so that we can continue to improve ourselves for better sales.

Next Twitter. It’s the next biggest things after Facebook, and in some ways even bigger than Facebook because of it’s microblogging format. Tweeting facts about our company or quotes from customer feedback would be a phenomenal way to get our name out there. Not only would people see our Tweets but they have the possibility of retweeting them. It’s a great tool to get our products out to those people we otherwise wouldn’t have been able to reach. You wouldn’t have to worry about finding people to see the Tweet initially at first either. You just have to tag a Tweet to categorize it and then people will find it based on that.

Instagram is something like Twitter except instead of 140 characters to write something you get a small square to take a picture with some kind of caption. You can utilize tagging in the same way we would on Twitter and when people find our Instagram posts they would be able to see a great visual representation of our company as opposed to words. Some people out there respond more with a visual aid and I believe it would be important to incorporate this into our company.

The benefits of these platforms are astronomical and I truly believe that should we invest in them it will do wonders for the way we market ourselves.

Thank you for taking the time to consider this proposal. I look forward to hearing from you about it.

My best,
An Employee of The Company I Work For

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A Lesson on Internet Etiquette

Before I start, let me just say that this article was a pain in the butt to read. Hopefully my condensed summary can help you guys write up a good response.

Anna Emilia’s article goes over social media etiquette that one should practice when interacting with others over the internet. She basically comes to the realization that interacting with others is no different over the internet than it is in person. That means staying attentive in conversations, showing the others respect, etc. To help her reinforce this idea, Anna called upon the many blogging gurus to share their wisdom in only 7000 words!

In her wonderful summary of basic do’s and don’ts of social media, Anna outlines what you should and should not do when using things like Facebook and Twitter. I read through the list and thought to myself, Isn’t this stuff pretty obvious? It’s like asking, would you run through the streets maked while screaming profanities at others? The correct answer is no. If you wouldn’t do it in public, then why do it online? It is true that staying anonymous on the internet is actually quite easy, but karma does exist. People see what is posted publicly, and if you’re the guy who is ranting about how he hates black people, expect to receive some hate.

Another good point about blogging that she makes is to keep blogging content relative to the blog. I actually have to keep this in mind myself since I maintain a music blog. It’s good to go on tangents every once in a while to keep everything nice and diverse, but that doesn’t mean to suddenly post about why frog legs taste just like chicken. That also means not to flood your reader with content. Anna calls it “overshare”, where the blogger drowns his or her readers in massive amounts of posts, relative or not to the actual blog. That is the quickest way to kill off current and potential readers.

The one part that I found really helpful from Anna’s post was on tone. Yes, tone. I see it all the time on Facebook and tumblr; people come and they rant nonstop. A high school friend of mine is actually a perfect example of this. He’s a nice guy in real life, but online, he’s just a cynical asshole (can I use this word in a blog post?) that spews his hatred over the newsfeed for all to see. It’s a mess. Please don’t do this when you blog. This apples to her other points as well, but you should also remember who is going to read what you post. If it affects somebody else, don’t forget that there is someone else on the other end of computer who is the object of your writing, regardless of its intention. Saying something nasty about someone else could come back to bite you one day. Treating others poorly will only result in more hostility. Feels like grade school, doesn’t it? Treat others the way you want to be treated. It might seem obvious, but you would be surprised at how many people forget something as simple as this. There’s a reason why teachers even bother with the saying: it’s true.

The next section is on how to act properly for the different social media platforms, such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc., but I won’t go through the details. I’m sure most of you already know how to behave properly online. As for my thoughts on the remaining XXXX amount of words left in the article, I have to say that most of it was pretty…boring. It might be interesting for someone who uses social media as a second identity, but I really only use Facebook (for chatting and what not). Looking at what Emily Henderson had to say on personal pet peeves, I had no idea what she was talking about when dealing with big companies screwing up Twitter with bad twittetiquette. It didn’t really have to do with social media etiquette for us bloggers, and it just seemed kind of silly in general. If you don’t like the way someone writes, then don’t read it. Anyways, I won’t bore you guys any longer with more details, so here’s the tldr on what awesome bloggers think about social media: don’t hate, appreciate.

So What is Social Media?

I think that social media is a place where people can connect with one another. Through social media ideas and opinions are expressed and exchanged to peers and outsiders. The most common examples of these are things such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and my personal favorite YouTube. These are not the only forms of social media but the most commonly known. Social media can include things like Wiki and other websites. I think blogging could be a form of social media. The reason I think this is because readers can connect with other readers through the comments. As a reader you are expressing your ideas and opinions and others are communicating to you by commenting on these ideas. The author themselves are presenting information to the world where there world is communicating their ideas and opinions to the blogger. Blogging fits into the definition of social media because both the blogger and the readers express ideas. Other forms of social media, such a ABC, do not allow their audience to interact with them. Social media does not have to include the participation of the audience but the best form of social media is this ability to for the audience and provider to communicate and interact with one another.

Twitter’s impact on Journalism

Simmons, Bill. Interview with Matt Taibbi. The B.S. Report. Grantland, 24 April 2013. 19 September 2013. http://www.grantland.com/blog/the-triangle/post/_/id/59585/b-s-report-matt-taibbi.

In this interview, Grantland’s Bill Simmons and Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi discussed numerous topics. They touched on the Boston Marathon Bombings, and the relationship between journalism accuracy and twitter posts during the search for the bombers. Do we have a responsibility to just report something we hear from a 140 character post that may not be accurate, or wait to report if the information is legitimately correct? Many news sources were criticized in the aftermath of the bombings for reporting false information. And if false information is reported, via blogging or twitter, do we have the responsibility to correct that information? Should live blogging follow the same rules as journalism, and can it be considered a form of journalism when largely amateurs are posting? Does emotion play a factor in the relationship between journalism and blogging? Information posted online from news sources was important, but as Simmons says Twitter allowed people to “play detective” doing their own work and publishing false or inaccurate information. Finally, internet rumors seem to be overtaking journalism, and promotes misbehavior.