Tagged: media

What is Social Media?

In my opinion, the definition of social media is a platform where people can write about anything freely. People have a lot of freedom based on whether or not they want to see things and who they want to follow. However, the potential to actually see everything is possible. Think about Facebook, people can connect with friends and see anything that is posted from a newsfeed. However, it is only with people you are “friends” with. In order to see anything else you must have permission from the other person. It is this that separates it from a blog. With a blog, your posts and information are accessible to anyone and you might not even know that person is following you. I think this small point is the thing that separates blogs from official social media.

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A Linear View

In my mind, linearity is perfectly described by the standard novel. An index is included to help organize the author’s writing, but it is mostly a single stream of information. Everything is presented in a single way; there is no other way to interact with the text. It is there for the user to read. You would not read a story out of order, and the same goes for linearity. It has to be in order. Lupton mentions Microsoft Power Point as an example. While each slide offers room to present information in an attractive and creative way, ultimately everything must happen in the order that the presenter set things up. That is what linearity is. It is a control over media and writing that commands the user or reader to experience something in a certain way. It is in that regard that the internet and typography has freed humans from the reigns of linearity. Not everyone has to experience something the same way as someone else. When browsing through a webpage, the user has the choice to view exactly what they want to. Their experience will be different from the next person, and it makes creative works far more flexible. I do not think that blogs are completely free of linearity. It is a stepping stone to non-linearity, but it still has several key characteristics that roots it in the common written work. For one, a blog is written in a way that is usually organized by date. It is a stream of information coming from the writer, and in that sense, the user can experience everything in a linear way. However, a blog also has options that allow users to read only the posts that they find interesting. These options create a new experience each time someone views the blog, whereas a book never changes. You read a book, and the experience will always be the same. I think that is essentially what Lupton is getting at with typography; it changes how we look at things.

Linearity? Thankfully not math related…

When seeing the word linearity, I automatically thought of single, one way- like linear lines (hmm, are my math skills up to date?). When reading her article, it states different features of writing that show meaning and show that one actually cared while writing a post. She explains some concepts like spacing, grammar usages, linearity, etc. I think Lupton’s meaning of linearity is a blogger who posts directly about his opinions without a comment section, or a news site on TV, in which people cannot respond directly back to the anchors. She states a CNN ticker displaying news constantly. This is a great form of linearity because people cannot input feedback, whereas, say, for a blog post, people can comment all they want and respond to different ideas. Hence, a blog is not a linear form, as long as the blogger has the comments section open. My idea of linearity is just a direct message, like a radio station. They repeat the same songs over and over, and us listeners have no great control of it and cannot directly tell the DJ/radio host about our feelings. A blog is definitely not linear because readers can refute or agree on a post and the blogger’s ideas. They can comment and directly interact with the bloggers. The tools mentioned are a great form of helping a reader divert from linearity because people do not have to sit there with the blog post. They can navigate around and not be influenced by a single post. They can look at other posts and comment on other ideas. They are not enforced to stay on one page, with one post, and just one opinion. This was a confusing article, and it takes a while to interpret. But overall, a general post should NOT be linear. It should also have great punctuation, quickness, and a good idea that people can comment on.

Amazing, new annotated bib

Bargh, John A., and Katelyn Y.A. McKenna. “The Internet and Social Life.” National Institute of Mental Health and by the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Stanford University, 2003. Web. 11 Oct. 2013. <http://www.yale.edu/acmelab/articles/Internet_and_Social_Life.pdf&gt;.

 

This long article, conducted and written by John Bargh and Katelyn McKenna represent the quick paced society and the evolution of the internet. I want to prove that the quick paced world wants quick information via the internet. The two describe the history of how the internet has evolved. They state that people today depend on the internet to connect with each other quickly. They want quick information via e-mails, articles online, or chatting. People want to know what is going on with others and in the world quickly, compared to a few hundred years ago, when they relied on slow morse codes and one way radio stations. With the Internet, people are quickly connected, and because the world is advancing, there are better and faster ways to connect with everyone. They conducted a research on college students and how they prefer e-mail usages. A majority of their clients stated that e-mails are great because they connect others so well and is best for doing projects. 4% said otherwise. In the workplace as well, businesses want to be the best. They want to adapt to the quickly changing consumers’ preferences. People want quicker information, so businesses provide their data online so that they can gain more people. Everyone wants quick information to stay connected with each other. Work places interact via e-mails and they also discovered the fact that there was less negativity through e-mails and quick, online information.

Hacking Life with one tip at a time

How do I hang these posters? How do I manage my money better? How do I save time? What do I wear to an interview? If you always ask these questions and more, do visit Lifehacker.com 

Such an interesting website that teaches people about… life and its little hacks. When you first open up the website, you see that there are many different posts and headings. The descriptions are longer than the headings in the middle, main section, while on the left sidebar, there are all headings that may lure you in. Pictures accompany every post.

There are many authors for this site, but all generally have a similar sense of writing. They all write about life tips, but everyone presents it in their own voice. Some authors are funny and satirical, while others are very serious. Some posts are short but sweet, while others are a bit lengthier. None of the posts I have read are too lengthy, in which I get bored and start losing my train of thoughts.

The writings on Lifehacker are very straightforward , sometimes mocking; they get to their points, addressing their audience and whomever might need a certain advice. Every post seems like a conversation, which is great. Titles are bold and big, so it catches your eye. All word choices are appropriate, all ideas are organized, logical, and smooth. Some authors write about their own experiences whilst creating their tips.

This an interesting site that that really keeps you interested at all times. There are so many different topics and tips on life, ranging from making a hammock to downloading the latest apps. It really keeps you interested and laughing. Authors also get to participate with commenting, so there is a huge interaction level that reaches the audiences, which is totally beyond just presenting an article and hoping your readers will understand.

Lifehacker is a pretty nice blog that constantly updates with new tips and ideas.

PCGamer: Good or Bad Writing

One website I frequent is called PCGamer. I go there daily for all of my pc gaming news, and I usually end up reading all of the posts published that day. One thing that I’ve never actually done is analyze the writing of the articles. For me, I think it’s a mix between serious writing and humorous writing. Some articles I find very interesting because the writer includes things like pictures with funny captions. Other times, the writing can be very long, drawn out, and overly expressive. It really depends on the writer in my opinion. These websites all have multiple writers that each bring their own set of skills and styles to the table. I know for a fact that there is one horrendous writer on PCGamer. He writes not to entertain the reader, but to entertain himself. His prose is long, overly complicated, and defiant of grammatical law. It’s good to vary vocabulary, but he does it so frequently that the original message takes multiple google searches to decrypt what is actually there. That is a bad thing. Is it good writing? Perhaps, but not the type of writing suited for the website. I believe diversity is important for a blog or website because otherwise, we would end up reading basically the same writing over and over and over again. Having a variety of voices all bringing you fascinating information is much more entertaining. However, there should be a fine line between varied and just flat out unnatural.

A good writer for a blog should be unique enough to have their own style and voice, but still constrained to the overall style of the blog as a whole. That means if a blog is exceptionally clean and devoid of swears or curse words, one particular writer should not go out of their way to add profanities just to make their writing a little more different. In the case of PCGamer, I feel as though that particular writer should lessen his use of large words and intricate sentence structure. I go there to read about the next big game coming out; I don’t go there to watch a writer bask in his self-indulgent word porn. Overall, I would say PCGamer has exceptionally good writing (for the most part). It’s snappy, informative, varied, and very entertaining to read. The skill level of the writer will vary from article to article, but I definitely feel it is one of the better websites out there.

BIB #3

http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/how-fast-and-flexible-do-you-want-your-information-really/

Davenport, Thomas H., and Jim H. Snabe. “MIT Sloan Management Review.” MIT Sloan Management Review RSS. MIT, 23 Mar. 2011. Web. 04 Oct. 2013. <http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/how-fast-and-flexible-do-you-want-your-information-really/&gt;.

Basically talks about a testing these two authors conducted on businesses wanting to provide the fastest information to customers. It pertains to my thesis because I really want to emphasize the fact that because the world is advancing, people want quicker information. The “Research Feature” states that customers wanted quicker information for faster decisions, which in turn creates faster performance for these businesses. They asked 302 senior executives about them wanting faster information. They want faster [and shorter] information so that they can read more and gain more knowledge by researching more. The faster and shorter the information, the more readers crave and want. They also state how businesses benefit from faster information delivered by the IT department so that they can correct their bad performances quickly. Davenport is an IT and management professor, and Snabe is a CEO.