Tagged: Education

Which is Better Blogging or Journalism?

Lowrey, Wilson. “Mapping the journalism–blogging relationship.” Journalism 7.4 (2006): 477-500.

This article talks about the relationship between blogging and Journalism. They mention here that many think that blogging has exposed a lot of the weaknesses found in journalism. The author supports this claim by mentioning that bloggers have really called news programs out for reporting the wrong information. This has caused bloggers to shame journalist to do a better job. The reason a conflict between the two groups exists is because they work in the same area. The author basically compares and contrasts these two topics. He mentions that unlike bloggers, journalists get paid. Because they get paid the do look up the grittier and boring aspects of the news. Bloggers are also dependent on mainstream news media for their reporting. Journalists are also able to cover more areas due to their resources. He also mentions the disadvantages to journalism. The author says that journalist may work in the direction that would benefit the company they are working for; they have constraints and must follow the rules to ensure the success of their company. Another disadvantage to journalism is that journalists are limited based on their advertisers. The author quotes a blogger names Markos Moulitsas saying “I can write about whatever I want….at the end of the day, I don’t need advertisers.” Bloggers careers or stories are not decided by advertisers therefore they can say whatever they like. Journalists are very limited to the information they can revel because of their company and also those they sponsor. This article will help out in supporting the idea that Journalism and blogging are not the same thing. They are very different from each other and provided different forms of information; no one is better than the other because they both have flaws.

Linearity? Thankfully not math related…

When seeing the word linearity, I automatically thought of single, one way- like linear lines (hmm, are my math skills up to date?). When reading her article, it states different features of writing that show meaning and show that one actually cared while writing a post. She explains some concepts like spacing, grammar usages, linearity, etc. I think Lupton’s meaning of linearity is a blogger who posts directly about his opinions without a comment section, or a news site on TV, in which people cannot respond directly back to the anchors. She states a CNN ticker displaying news constantly. This is a great form of linearity because people cannot input feedback, whereas, say, for a blog post, people can comment all they want and respond to different ideas. Hence, a blog is not a linear form, as long as the blogger has the comments section open. My idea of linearity is just a direct message, like a radio station. They repeat the same songs over and over, and us listeners have no great control of it and cannot directly tell the DJ/radio host about our feelings. A blog is definitely not linear because readers can refute or agree on a post and the blogger’s ideas. They can comment and directly interact with the bloggers. The tools mentioned are a great form of helping a reader divert from linearity because people do not have to sit there with the blog post. They can navigate around and not be influenced by a single post. They can look at other posts and comment on other ideas. They are not enforced to stay on one page, with one post, and just one opinion. This was a confusing article, and it takes a while to interpret. But overall, a general post should NOT be linear. It should also have great punctuation, quickness, and a good idea that people can comment on.

Amazing, new annotated bib

Bargh, John A., and Katelyn Y.A. McKenna. “The Internet and Social Life.” National Institute of Mental Health and by the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Stanford University, 2003. Web. 11 Oct. 2013. <http://www.yale.edu/acmelab/articles/Internet_and_Social_Life.pdf&gt;.

 

This long article, conducted and written by John Bargh and Katelyn McKenna represent the quick paced society and the evolution of the internet. I want to prove that the quick paced world wants quick information via the internet. The two describe the history of how the internet has evolved. They state that people today depend on the internet to connect with each other quickly. They want quick information via e-mails, articles online, or chatting. People want to know what is going on with others and in the world quickly, compared to a few hundred years ago, when they relied on slow morse codes and one way radio stations. With the Internet, people are quickly connected, and because the world is advancing, there are better and faster ways to connect with everyone. They conducted a research on college students and how they prefer e-mail usages. A majority of their clients stated that e-mails are great because they connect others so well and is best for doing projects. 4% said otherwise. In the workplace as well, businesses want to be the best. They want to adapt to the quickly changing consumers’ preferences. People want quicker information, so businesses provide their data online so that they can gain more people. Everyone wants quick information to stay connected with each other. Work places interact via e-mails and they also discovered the fact that there was less negativity through e-mails and quick, online information.

Hacking Life with one tip at a time

How do I hang these posters? How do I manage my money better? How do I save time? What do I wear to an interview? If you always ask these questions and more, do visit Lifehacker.com 

Such an interesting website that teaches people about… life and its little hacks. When you first open up the website, you see that there are many different posts and headings. The descriptions are longer than the headings in the middle, main section, while on the left sidebar, there are all headings that may lure you in. Pictures accompany every post.

There are many authors for this site, but all generally have a similar sense of writing. They all write about life tips, but everyone presents it in their own voice. Some authors are funny and satirical, while others are very serious. Some posts are short but sweet, while others are a bit lengthier. None of the posts I have read are too lengthy, in which I get bored and start losing my train of thoughts.

The writings on Lifehacker are very straightforward , sometimes mocking; they get to their points, addressing their audience and whomever might need a certain advice. Every post seems like a conversation, which is great. Titles are bold and big, so it catches your eye. All word choices are appropriate, all ideas are organized, logical, and smooth. Some authors write about their own experiences whilst creating their tips.

This an interesting site that that really keeps you interested at all times. There are so many different topics and tips on life, ranging from making a hammock to downloading the latest apps. It really keeps you interested and laughing. Authors also get to participate with commenting, so there is a huge interaction level that reaches the audiences, which is totally beyond just presenting an article and hoping your readers will understand.

Lifehacker is a pretty nice blog that constantly updates with new tips and ideas.

BIB #3

http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/how-fast-and-flexible-do-you-want-your-information-really/

Davenport, Thomas H., and Jim H. Snabe. “MIT Sloan Management Review.” MIT Sloan Management Review RSS. MIT, 23 Mar. 2011. Web. 04 Oct. 2013. <http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/how-fast-and-flexible-do-you-want-your-information-really/&gt;.

Basically talks about a testing these two authors conducted on businesses wanting to provide the fastest information to customers. It pertains to my thesis because I really want to emphasize the fact that because the world is advancing, people want quicker information. The “Research Feature” states that customers wanted quicker information for faster decisions, which in turn creates faster performance for these businesses. They asked 302 senior executives about them wanting faster information. They want faster [and shorter] information so that they can read more and gain more knowledge by researching more. The faster and shorter the information, the more readers crave and want. They also state how businesses benefit from faster information delivered by the IT department so that they can correct their bad performances quickly. Davenport is an IT and management professor, and Snabe is a CEO.

Blogs and Instructions

Blogging in the Classroom: A Preliminary Exploration of Student Attitudes and Impact on Comprehension

Ellison and WU investigation on the advantages of blogging in the classroom comes to show that students between the age of “8 to 18 spend an equivalent of more than 8.5 hours of media daily”.   This comes to show us that millennia’s are exposed to the technology so much more that this new way of learning can bring better outcomes.  Some of the benefits mentioned by Ellison and WU are

  1. “Blogging can enhance analytic and critical thinking skills”
    1. In other words students have a tendency to engage more and write much better when their papers are not only read by the professor. Students get interested on the idea that different people will read their posts such as peers and other followers.  Also students are more carefully when writing online since their audience is no longer just the professor.
    2. “ The ability to express oneself in a digital environment”
      1. Having a virtual profile online allows many students that are shy to express themselves when it comes to their writing and the comments they leave for their friends. In addition, students can customize their own blogs to fit their preferences and their personality.

During this Ellison and WU states that  “Reading other students’ work exposed them to different perspectives and that, they were surprised at the range of responses.” She even writes that students said that

  • A student from the research wrote a post on his blog and questioning the author of the book and the student reported that he had received a comment on his blog from the author of the book
    • “I think it is more effective using the WWW because anyone can view it and we saw that when Ryan’s blog was commented by the actual author of the piece we read.”

“Internet-based communication, technologies allow students to create and share their writing, as opposed to merely consuming texts selected by the instructor, these tools are inherently well-suited to support these kinds of constructivist, peer-focused experiences”

To end this great article Allison and WU stated “these findings suggest that students need explicit guidance in regards to defining their positions and reflecting on their ideas in the context of others’ writing. Only then can the pedagogical promise of blogging be met”.  In other words, a teacher can’t simply just require students to crate blogs and comment on each other blogs because the effectiveness of the blogging tool will not flourish in the classroom. Instead, teachers need to create guidelines, requirements and instructions about blogging in order to see students engaging, learning and sharing their own ideas.

Ellison, Nicole B., and Yuehua Wu. “Blogging In The Classroom: A Preliminary Exploration Of Student Attitudes And Impact On Comprehension.” Journal Of Educational Multimedia & Hypermedia 17.1 (2008): 99-122. OmniFile Full Text Mega (H.W. Wilson). Web. 2 Oct. 2013.

“nude media”

Sometimes, you can’t help but feel bad for authors or publishers who lose credit for their work because a lot of people on the web strip down their articles and posts. Of course, I’m sure these authors know that once their work goes on the web, it’ll be taken, morphed, and who knows what online. However, there is a sense of respect that people who take these works should have… they should respect the creator of an article and give credit.

In the article, “Nude Media”, it states that news really gets stripped down from a highly photo populated and joyous article to a dull, just text, article. It’s sort of sad to see that all the hard work towards a newspaper article cannot be recreated for a website. I completely agree with everything that is said in the article. There is a big difference of how producers exchange and give off their work on the web. Their articles are not ‘clothed’ anymore and are stripped of its natural beauty. People should not try to strip down an article or post that often because it defeats the purpose of the article. Pictures are what gives extra insight to any articles.

Lauren’s photos are also so rare but.. beautiful. Automatically, without reading a caption, I assumed that she was recreating a magazine or newspaper world with dots, dots, and more dots. It’s really interesting because you never see how much content we give off in magazines and newspapers without many pictures. Lauren’s paintings really show that a magazine article should be filled with information with a little bit of decoration. Her paintings are different from the norm. It shows off social media so well, stating that people need to read the magazine.

After reading the “Nude Media” article and staring at Lauren’s paintings, there is a correlation. Both stripped down articles. (She did it in painting form though.) I feel more compelled to use images and quote with sources and thank those who create awesome pieces of work for the world to see. These people have a lot of courage to show off their work.